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Minority Engineer Magazine, launched in 1979, is a career- guidance and recruitment magazine offered at no charge to qualified engineering or computer-science students and professionals who are African-American, Hispanic, Native American, and Asian American. Minority Engineer presents career strategies for readers to assimilate into a diversified job marketplace.

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 ‘Hidden Figures’ Wins Best Book Award from National Academies

 
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) honored the recipients of the 2017 Communication Awards earlier this fall during a ceremony in Washington, DC.
Among those winners from 290 entries for works published or aired in 2016 was Margot Lee Shetterly for Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race (William Morrow/HarperCollins Publishers).
The book is, according to the NASEM, “a hitherto little-known episode in the history of pioneering aerospace engineering and computing brought to light so engagingly that, along with the blockbuster movie it inspired, has had an unprecedented impact on the American public.”
Finalists in this book category also included Jennifer Ackerman for The Genius of Birds (Penguin Press), Siddhartha Mukherjee for The Gene: An Intimate History (Scribner) and Ed Yong for I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life (Ecco/HarperCollins Publishers).
For a full list of winners, visit www8.nationalacademies.org/onpinews/newsitem.aspx?RecordID=7272017 and search hashtag #NASEMCommAward on Twitter.
Supported by the W.M. Keck Foundation since 2003 as part of the Foundation’s Futures Initiative, these prestigious awards - each of which includes a $20,000 prize - recognize excellence in reporting and communicating science, engineering and medicine to the general public, notes Washington, DC-based NASEM.
“This year’s winners represent a magnificent array of enlightening and engrossing science stories compellingly told in a diversity of formats in a variety of voices,” says May Berenbaum, NAS member and chair of the awards selection committee, and professor and head of entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. “We’re delighted to recognize the 2017 winning science communicators, and with such stellar entries overall, I can’t help but feel that all of us, both in scientific community and the general public, are winners.”
The National Academies are private, non-profit institutions that provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology and medicine. The Academies operate under an 1863 congressional charter to the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President Lincoln.
 
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